THE REUNION
Volume 45, No.1      June 1981

 

BRACEWELL REUNION SET FOR JUNE 7

Bracewell Reunion 1981 president Vivian Cox has announced that the clan will gather Sunday, June 7, 1981 at the Bedias Civic Center Building. The formalities will begin at 11:00 a.m., but many come early to enjoy coffee and fellowship with friends and family members.

Following our recent tradition of honoring children of Joseph Marion and Emiline each year, this year's Reunion will be in special remem­brance of Uncle Frank Bracewell, their fifth child, and Aunt Emma Tuck, their 6th child.

Bracewells from every branch of the family will attend to hear family news, renew old acquaintances, visit with loved ones, and enjoy a bount­iful communal type picnic lunch.

First Bracewell in America

The first recorded Bracewell in America was the parson, Robert Bracewell, who was graduated from Oxford University, England in November 1631, and came to America as minister of St. Luke's Church in 1656.

The church was built in 1632 to serve the first English colony established in Virginia, Jamestown, in April of 1619. St. Luke's is the oldest church of English cons­truction in America. The church came to be called, "The Old Brick Church", and is now preserved and maintained by the State of Virginia. It stands in southern Virginia about 5 miles from Smithfield, in Isle of Wight County.

Robert Bracewell was the 4th minister of this church and served until his death in 1668. A plaque has been placed in the church which reads "In honor of Reverend Robert Braswell, 1613-1668". The branch of the family placing the plaque has changed the spelling of their sur­name to "Braswell", although all records show that the Reverend spelled it "Bracewell".

*** Photos ***

Biographical Information Edwin Franklin Bracewell

Born: September 23, 1877 near Bedias.

Married: Mollie Kerr June 26, 1903.

Died: April 20, 1962 at Bedias.

Buried at Mt. Pleasant Church Cemetery near Bedias.

Uncle Frank was the 6th child of Joseph and Emiline. Always known as Uncle Frank, he was an indus­trious, kind, loving, and generous man. Most will remember him as the owner/operator of the gin and country store at Cotton, Texas.

He was a faithful member of Mount Pleasant Church all of his life, and attended every Reunion held from the first in 1936. He graciously accepted the position of Reunion president eight times.

Uncle Frank and Aunt Mollie had four children:

Mona  (May 7, 1900)
R. Arden        (Jan. 26, 1906)
Druie  (Oct. 7, 1908)
J. Malcolm     (Oct. 7, 1913)

Biographical Information Emma C. (Bracewell) Tuck

Born: August 24, 1875 in Bedias

Married: Nov. 17, 1897 to Arthur E. Tuck.

Died: February 23, 1952 in Baytown Buried at Cedar Bayou, Texas.

Aunt Emma was the 7th child of Joseph Marion and Emiline Bracewell.

Uncle Arthur and Aunt Emma farmed in Grimes County about 18 years and Arthur served as County Commissioner in 1912-1914. The family lived in several towns before moving to Goose Creek (now Baytown), where they spent the rest of their lives. Uncle Arthur died in 1939.  Aunt Emma enjoyed the annual reunions and always attended.

Emma's children were:

Robert Randolph Tuck (Dec. 30, 1898 - Oct. 10, 1918). Died in WW I and buried at Cedar Bayou.

Joseph Grady Tuck (Apr. 26, 1901)
Vivian Violet Tuck    (Aug. 6, 1903)
Thelma Erin Tuck    (June 14, 1906)
Arthur E. Tuck          (Feb. 4, 1909)
Vernice Ester Tuck  (June 26, 1911)


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Cousin Mona Stephens Remembers Her Father

My father was born a few miles northeast of Bedias on the old Bracewell homestead. He lived in this area his entire life except for a short period at Athens, Texas and a few months attending business

school in Dallas. His formal edu­cation was acquired at old Sand Hill School. He was well read and always took an active interest in cur­rent events, local, and political affairs. United with Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church at an early age, he held continuous membership until his death. He served as deacon 49 years.

Frank Bracewell was a kind, loving, generous husband and father and may possibly have been termed "indulgent" in the vernacular of that day and age, but not always predict­able, as I can attest to on more than one occasion.

Being a typical Bracewell, he was faithful and devoted to his family, church and God, and always ready to lend a helping hand to a friend in need.

I have so many beautiful memories of my Dad. He was a lot of fun when we were growing up. The times I remember best were the long winter nights when we played all kinds of games and the whole family joined in. Most of the games were either invented by Dad or re­membered from his childhood. He told us some jokes about some of our Uncles. Grandma told us things like that too, so I'm not sure now who told which stories, but we had lots of fun listening. When we had school friends or cousins stay over night he enjoyed them as much as we did.

Sometimes our mother would join in. She was more strict with us than Dad. When she told us to do some­thing, we knew we had to do it or suffer the consequences.

We might get out of something Dad told us to do, especially if Druie would sit in his lap and hug his neck or make him laugh that would change things. He was about the same way with his grandchildren.

We were living at Cotton, or around close, and there was a store close to the house that was not always open. The customers would just drive up and call out or blow their horn knowing that Dad would always open up to fill their needs. At least one time he had just been to the store and had comeback to the house to meet Druie's and my children begging for candy. We finally got them quieted down, but Papa couldn't resist them and said "Oh, come on, I may just as well go get it."

Because the kids always cried to go home with them every time he and Mama came to visit us they would bring a sack of candy and Double Bubble gum to give them when they left to prevent the kids from crying.

*** Frank Bracewell family tree ***

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Lyndon Johnson, Our Cousin

Ronald Bracewell has documented that Lyndon Johnson's GGGGGGG grandmother was Jane (Bracewell) Eley) who was the daughter of Par­son Robert Bracewell and the sister of Richard Bracewell, who is our ancestor.

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Descendents of James Newton Bracewell

James Newton Bracewell was one of Joseph Marion's older brothers who followed him to
Texas in 1875. 

Of his seven children who reached maturity) two were girls and five were boys.  Al­most all of the Bracewells in Texas who are not from the Joseph Marion branch are descended from James Newton.

From a "Syphrett Family His­tory" furnished to us, we learn that three of the James New­ton sons married Syphrett sis­ters. These were:

Winder Crough B. mar. Love America S.

Joseph Jackson B. mar. Sarah Clyde S.

Benjamin Stephens B. mar. Mary Ann S.

The current addresses of many of these Bracewell Syphrett descendents were supplied with the history, and notices are being sent in the hope that they will be interested in joining us at            the Reunion on June 7.

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Back Issues of "The Reunion" Available

 

1971 Bracewells Since 1700

1977 Hugh Bracewell Issue

1978 Barto Bracewell Issue

1979 Joseph Benjamin Bracewell Issue

1980 Calvin & Walter Bracewell Issue

Also 1978 Booklet "Joseph Marion and Emmeline Bracewell" by Ruby Dooley.

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OTIS BRACEWELL

A Visit To Our Ancestral Home

By Joe Taylor

Around 1780, our ancestor, Richard Bracewell, moved from the Tarboro, North Carolina area to Washington County, Georgia on to "new land's, being taken from the Indians and given to settlers on a lottery basis.

In 1793-94, Richard's son, another Richard, married Charity Scarborough, and their first child, James, was born at Allen's Fort, located on the Oconee River in what later became Laurens County.

On July 19, 18115, Richard bought lot #205 (202 1/2) acres and on the 25th bought lot #206, all totaling 405 acres for $1,000 in notes.

These tracts were just west of Allen's Fort in a newly opened sec­tion designated as the Pine Tucky district of Laurens County. The tracts are located about 10 miles south of Dublin Georgia near a

Settlement called Rock Springs.

The Bracewells lived on this pro­perty until at least 1839.

I visited this area April 27 with our kinsman, Ronald Bracewell, who is diligently putting together the com­plete record of the Bracewells from the time of their arrival in America.

The country is largely pine and oak forested, sandy hills, with a few cultivated acres, and looks like the area around Cleveland and Livinstone, Texas.

We visited Rock Springs Baptist Church and Cemetery (established 1848), which had several Bracewells as founding members.  The cemetery is well kept and has 40-50 Bracewell tombstones as well as many others of wives who were born Bracewells. A second cemetery, called the Smith Cemetery, was smaller, well kept, and had a good representation of Bracewells, inclu­ding Ronald's great great grand­father, Seaborn A. Bracewell.

It was a pleasure to visit with Otis Bracewell and his wife, Adel. They are a delightful couple who will be celebrating their 50th anniversary in August.

Otis is 77 years old and the recog­nized authority on all of the Bracewells in the Laurens Country area over the past century. He is very energetic and active and relates Bracewell genealogy with no uncertainty in great detail. Otis is a carpenter. Before he re­tired, he built private homes as well as major commercial projects in different parts of the United States. Since "retirement", he has slowed down to a 10-hour week in his shop at home doing cabinet work, furni­ture repair and refinishing, and sharpening saws for everyone for miles around. He puts in a lot of time with his large garden and many fruit trees, and spends a good deal of his free time with his boat on the Oconee River, only a half mile away, fishing.

Otis gave us a demonstration of the proper method of filing saw blades, while at the same time filling us in on many details of Bracewell line­age. Otis has many pieces of inter­esting handmade furniture and tools. Naturally, he wouldn't let me leave without giving me one of his cherished tools as a memento of our visit. I think you will agree that Otis has many traits that mark him as the type of Bracewell we know.

I was not surprised to find that Laurens County Bracewells are fine, God-fearing people, who enjoy visit­ing and discussing Bracewell history.

If you have occasion to be in this area of Georgia, I recommend you plan to stop in Dublin.


*** Map of Dublin Georgia ***

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*** Family tree of Emma C. (Bracewell) Tuck ***

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THE 45TH ANNUAL BRACEWELL REUNION

 

Bedias Community Center

Bedias, Texas

EMMA            FRANK

In Special Remembrance

Emma (Tuck) Bracewell

and

Frank Bracewell

Sunday

June 7, 1981

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Biographical Information Edwin Franklin Bracewell


Born: September 23, 1877 near Bedias.

Married: Mollie Kerr 3une 26, 1903. Died: April 20, 1962 at Bedias.

Buried at Mt. Pleasant Church Cemetery near Bedias.

Uncle Frank was the 6th child of Joseph and Emiline. Always known as Uncle Frank, he was an industrious, kind, loving, and generous man. Most will remember him as the owner/operator of the gin and country store at Cotton, Texas.

He was a faithful member of Mount Pleasant Church all of his life, and attended every Reunion held from the first in 1936. He graciously accepted the position of Reunion president eight times.

Uncle Frank and Aunt Mollie had four children:

Mona  (May 7, 1904)
R. Arden        (3an. 26, 1906)
Druie  (Oct. 7, 1908)
J. Malcolm     (Oct. 7, 1913)

Biographical Information Emma C. (Bracewell) Tuck

Born: August 24, 1879 in Bedias

Married: Nov. 17, 1897 to Arthur E. Tuck. Died: February 23, 1952 in Baytown

Buried at Cedar Bayou, Texas.

Aunt Emma was the 7th child of Joseph Marion and Emiline

Bracewell.

Uncle Arthur and Aunt Emma farmed in Grimes County about 18 years and Arthur served as County Commissioner in 1912-1914. The family lived in several towns before moving to Goose Creek (now Baytown), where they spent the rest of their lives. Uncle Arthur died in 1939. Aunt Emma enjoyed the annual reunions and always attended.

Emma's children were:

Robert Randolph Tuck (Dec. 30~ 1898 - Oct. I0, 1918). Died in

WW I and buried at Cedar Bayou.

Joseph Grady Tuck (Apr. 26, 1901)
Vivian Violet Tuck    (Aug. 6, 1903)
Thelma Erin Tuck    (June 14, 1906)
Arthur E. Tuck          (Feb. 4, 1909)
Vernice Ester Tuck  (June 26, 1911)

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PROGRAM

Vivian Cox, President, Presiding

10:30  Visiting and Reacquaintance

 

11:00  Welcome and recognition of Visitors

Sing Service: Led by Raymond Bracewell

Opening Prayer

Business:

Old Business:           (Cemetery Fund Report)

New Business:         (Family Tree Update)

(Memorial Resolutions)

Election of Officers For 1982

Program:

Collection

Audience Participation

Roll Call of the Ancestors and Moment of Silence

Benediction and Blessing of Lunch

12:00  LUNCH

We would appreciate help from anyone who can stay over a few minutes to clean up the community center.

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Grandchildren of Frank Bracewell


Thru Mona:

Janell Stephens Joyce Stephens

Elvin Stephens


 


Thru Druie:


Sam Bracewell Farris

Kenneth Farris

Edward Sidney Farris


 


Thru Malcolm:

James Bracewell


Grandchildren of Emma Tuck


Thru Grady:


Vernon Tuck

Darrell Tuck

Dorothy Tuck

Grady Tuck, gr.

Doyle Keith Tuck


 


Thru Vivian:


Elda Williams

Helen Williams

Kenneth Williams


 


Thru Thelma:


MalcolmLee McCain

Marjorie Joyce McCain


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